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Save money with these simple tips.

1. Switch it off

The easiest way of all – when you’re not using an item, switch it off at the wall or unplug it. When you turn off things like a TV or computer, it switches into standby mode rather than completely switching off. This means it can still be using some electricity.

2. Wash smart

Wash your clothes in cold water and you will easily save at least $100 per year. Your clothes will probably last longer too! You should also wait until you have a full load rather than running the machine for just a couple of things. Try to minimise your dryer use and switch to a clothes line instead.

3. Close the gaps

It’s amazing how much heat can escape through a drafty door or window that won't close properly. Make sure all the gaps in your home are blocked (a door snake is a great investment) to get the most from your heater or air conditioner and spend less on electricity. It’s also good to close off areas of the house you aren’t using rather than trying to heat or cool empty rooms.

4. Dress for the weather

If it’s cold outside, put on an extra jumper before you turn up the heat. You shouldn’t expect to be sitting in shorts and a tshirt in the middle of winter. Running your heater less often or having it set at a lower temperature can save plenty of electricity.

5. Use your dishwasher

You might think that washing by hand would save electricity and water, but the opposite is actually true. As long as you use your dishwasher correctly and only run it when it is full, you can save on both your major utilities. Plus there’s all those hours you don’t have to spend standing at the sink.

6. Upgrade your appliances

This could present a pricey outlay upfront, but upgrading that leaking fridge or outdated dishwasher could save you in the long run. Most new products will have better energy ratings and you’ll see a significant drop in your power bills. You can also make sure you’re using energy efficient light bulbs across yoir house.

Do you agree with these tips?

Any advice contained in this communication is general advice only. None of the information provided is, or should be considered to be, personal financial advice.

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